Robb Mapou

Content authored by Dr. Robb Mapou

Disability Documentation and Accommodations for Learning Disabilities and ADHD

A board-certified clinical neuropsychologist who has been with The Stixrud Group since 1993. He evaluates adolescents, adults, and seniors for learning disabilities, ADHD, and range of neurological conditions, including concussion, dementia, stroke, severe traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. View Profile Dr, Robb Mapou will be presenting a Lunch and Learn on May 18 to staff at The Ross Center for Treatment of Anxiety and Related Disorders, in Washington, DC.  His topic is Disability Documentation and Accommodations for Learning Disabilities and ADHD.

2017-11-25T13:30:39+00:00 November 25th, 2017|Categories: Events|Tags: , , , |

When Should Patients be Refered for Neuropsychological Assessment?

A board-certified clinical neuropsychologist who has been with The Stixrud Group since 1993. He evaluates adolescents, adults, and seniors for learning disabilities, ADHD, and range of neurological conditions, including concussion, dementia, stroke, severe traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. View Profile NEW EVENT! Location: Ross Center for Anxiety and Related Disorders Washington D.C. Time: During monthly staff meeting Notes: Open to Ross Center staff

2017-12-03T22:19:48+00:00 September 1st, 2014|Categories: Events, Lectures|Tags: |

Dr. Robb Mapou Interviewed on Local News

A board-certified clinical neuropsychologist who has been with The Stixrud Group since 1993. He evaluates adolescents, adults, and seniors for learning disabilities, ADHD, and range of neurological conditions, including concussion, dementia, stroke, severe traumatic brain injury, and epilepsy. View Profile What: Dr. Robb Mapou was recently interviewed by Andrea Roane (WUSA, Channel 9 news) for a segment about ADHD in children, during which he refutes a “local expert’s” view that ADHD does not exist.  To see the interview, click here.

2017-12-03T16:02:04+00:00 July 3rd, 2014|Categories: News|Tags: |

Dr. Robb Mapou Published In November APA Monitor on Psychology

What: Dr. Robb Mapou had a letter published on the subject of the availability of accommodations for college students. His letter can be read in full here: http://www.apamonitor-digital.org/apamonitor/201411#pg7 This article was a response to a letter published in the September edition about the high level of stress many college students experience. This letter can be read in full here: http://www.apamonitor-digital.org/apamonitor/201409#pg39

2017-12-03T21:15:52+00:00 January 7th, 2014|Categories: News|Tags: |

When A College Student Thinks He or She Has ADHD – Dr. Robb Mapou

For the past 20 years, Dr. Stixrud has been extensively involved in the training and supervision of psychologists and learning specialists. View Profile Last week, Dr. Stixrud talked about the high level of fear and anxiety that may have led college students at Harvard to cheat. Anxiety may also cause college students to have difficulty concentrating and studying. “I think have a ADD,” said the college freshman sitting in my office. “Why do you think that?” I asked. “Well,” he responded, “I can’t concentrate, I am not getting my work done, and my grades are a whole lot worse than in high school.” This is a common exchange that I have with first year college students, who see me because they have found college more difficult than high school and harder than they thought. But for most, there have never been any concerns about attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), the correct name for what people call ADD. Many of these students are anxious about college and do not always know how to study properly. What they perceive as difficulty concentrating and getting their work done is actually due to this and not to ADHD. Also, this anxiety, combined with the heavy “party” environment now found on most college campuses, can lead to excessive drinking, marijuana use, or both, further eroding the ability to complete work. Finally, when placed in the dorm environment, many students have difficulty getting enough sleep and so can’t concentrate during the day. Although most of these students do not have ADHD, completing a comprehensive evaluation of cognitive skills, academic skills and emotional functioning can determine the cause of the problem and can lead to appropriate and effective intervention, so that college becomes easier and less stressful. It can also be reassuring for students to learn that they are “OK,” that they are not different from their classmates in what they are experiencing, and that they have many strengths that will help them succeed in college.

2017-12-03T22:15:45+00:00 October 12th, 2012|Categories: Blog Post|Tags: |